s

History

1971 – 2000

2000

B. Braun Biotech International, the world’s leading manufacturer of fermenters, bioreactors and cell cultivation systems, is acquired (now Sartorius Stedim Systems, photo).

1999

Sartorius acquires three companies, thereby expanding its product portfolio:

  • Vivascience (innovative products for cell culture technology, protein purification and ultrafiltration)
  • Denver Instrument Company (laboratory balances and measurement technology)
  • GWT (formerly known as Phillips Wägetechnik and leading in high-capacity weighing technology)

1998

Capital is successfully raised.

Sartorius acquires Boekels, market leader in quality control for the processing industry and in metal detection.

1996

The world's first ultra-microbalance debuts with a weighing capacity featuring a resolution of 21 million digits and an accuracy of 0.1 µg.

1994

Monolithic weigh cell technology is introduced. The monolithic weigh cell replaces a complicated weighing system made up of up to 150 different parts (photo). This new mechatronic system is the basis for many successive generations of balances and scales.

1990

The first electronic laboratory balance series featuring MC1 technology is introduced.

Sartorius goes public.

1989

The first large-area filter cartridge with progressively finer, targeted filtration (Jumbo cartridge) is unveiled.

1988

The first electronic toploading microbalance is presented.

1983

The first automatic unit for integrity testing of membrane filter systems is launched.

1982

The first explosion-protected version of an electronic precision balance in the world makes its debut.

1979

The first electronic analytical balance is presented (photo).

1977

The first fully electronic analytical balance with microprocessor electronics is launched.

1976

The first autoclavable, integrity-testable filter cartridge with a pleated membrane filter is unveiled (photo).

1975

A precision balance featuring microprocessor electronics (Intel4004) premieres.

1972

The first compact analytical balance with a digital, electronic weight display, stability control and digital output (BCD) is launched.

1971

The first nanogram balance sets the world record for the most precise weighing (photo). This balance is used to weigh the moon rocks that astronaut Neil Armstrong brought back to Earth from his expedition.

More History

1870 – 1930

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1931 – 1970

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2001 – today

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